Christine Lindey on Revolution: Russian art 1917-1932

21centurymanifesto

CHRISTINE LINDEY, writing in the Morning Star newspaper, takes issue with the reactionary agenda of an exhibition of marvellous Russian revolutionary art


IN JANUARY 1918 the Russian Soviet Republic was the first state in the world to officially support the avant-garde.

Fired by the revolution’s socialist ideology, artists rejected the tsarist regime’s fussy forms and fusty techniques, to embrace the latest technology.

They incorporated industrial forms into art, design, architecture and film which epitomised and promoted modernity.

The avant-garde’s dynamic axes, rapid juxtapositions, startling close-ups and pared-down geometric forms expressed revolutionary dynamism. From Lyubov Popova’s designs (above)  to Dziga Vertov’s films (below), the cogs and wheels of mechanisation, the magic of flying machines and electrification’s bright rays embodied and promised social progress.

It is always a joy to see these works and the Royal Academy’s exhibition Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932 is no exception. But they are familiar, due to their…

View original post 673 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s